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20130416
20130424
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KRCB (PBS) 19
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
to focus on the longer term fundamentals, which we still think are pretty good. the economy is still growing. earnings are still growing. the fed still pretty supportive. certainly volatility has picked up a bit this week. and we expect that to continue here in the nr term. >> that's what was going to ask you. assuming that this manhunt is solved and the suspect is apprehended this weekend, turning to monday, how do you think things are going to play out? what is going to happen next in the market? is volatility still going to dominate trading? are the markets going to go up? are they going to go down? what is your prediction? >> i think you have both macro and microtrends next week. as you said in the lead there, about 20% of companies in the s&p reported earnings. but it really gets heavy next week. we have about 170 companies in the s&p 500 reporting, and about ten dow components. and earnings have been mixed. they have been okay. topline has been a little soft. as bob pisani said, only about 45% of companies are beat top line. it reflects the sluggish global economy that we have.
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >>nd with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundation and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings within a
-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is one of the seneca lake 12, a group of activists who last month blocked the gates of a natural gas storage facility in the beautiful finger lakes region of new york state. on a bitterly cold day in march, they were arrested as they demonstrated against the environmental dangers of fracking and the storing of natural gas in nearby abandoned salt mines. for now, new york has declared a moratorium that prohibits fracking in the state while studies are completed. but, there's no guarantee that gas obtained by fracking elsewhere won't be stored in those salt caverns. as you can see, for sandra steingraber, there is no line between he
very quickly because the economy can't continue the way it is among other things giving gasoline away. they can't go on that way. >> nick raised the question of ideology. it's important to note that the opposition it wasn't an election about ideology. the opposition, what was fascinating about it is it ran on a comain to administer it more efficiently. they accepted the social missions. they accepted even the foreign policy. dressed in red. he was in some ways praising chavez and saying that maduro wasn't worthy. he see it wasn't an election about ideology but an election about continuing the goals. it's been remarkable. the way to think about it is to step back and really consider that this remarkable experiment in social democracy that we've seen more in south america than central america and mexico but a little bit in central america since for the last 10, 15 years beginning in some waysith chavez's election is outlasting. it's first-generation of leaders. lula went through his two terms. >> charlie: many people say he was a champion of the people who chavez thought he was the cham
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the blast, wheelchairs and stretchers were ferrying victims up and down boylston street, the home stretch of the oldest marathon race in the world. amid the chaos competitors, race volunteers and spectators ran from the scene in shock. >> i went over there. there were body parts. people were blown apart. they're dead. where the wind owe is, the windows were all blown out. >> ifill: the attack came about thr
enough to sell into somebody's lower income economies. they're never going to be the lowest price people, that's not in their d.n.a. but they may have to do something a little bit less expensive. >> rose: back to the point that i think technology is so interesting today. one as i just said is underdeveloped countries and it gives them the opportunity to leap ahead and do things. two is education. >> absolutely. >> rose: it's what the possibilities are. how you can educate. where you can get degrees and you can sit in india and take courses at harvard. >> right. >> yes. >> there's a lock going on. the university that larry summers is involved in. it was a whole university. >> and three which you just mentioned is health care. the possibilities of being able to understand and diagnose and tting accesso infmati. >> there's diabetes apps, heart apps. >> three there's a thing you can put on there which is a glucose meter like kara was saying which of course, die s diabetics have to measure their glucose now instead of being having a glucose meter. it's not just a computer, it can transmit it
's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the chechen-american teenager accused in the boston marathon bombings now faces a possible death sentence. the filing of charges today officially moved the case into the federal courts, even as the city began returning to normal. dzhokhar tsarnaev was arraigned this morning, at boston's beth israel deaconess hospital, where he remained in serious condition. a short time later came word of the complaint, filed by the u.s. justice department. it formally charged the 19-year- old with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction, potentially, a capital crime,
.s. economy and the epeng crisis in europe. they cut china's growth to 8% from 8.2%. >> a slow down in gdp in china got the blame. but ford does not see it that way, they are protecting that 40% of the sale s will come fro china. they have doubled their capacity, scrambling to keep up with demand to keep up with the market. we have a closer look at fd's rapid expansion there and the challenges it faces. >> he is part of the new wave in china. car buyers turning the western part of the country into one of the hottest auto markets in the world. >> translator: in his mind, he feels that the car, the brand is good. and the service is also excellent. so this is why he trusts this brand. >> here, the gateway to western china, growth in auto sales is particularly good news for ford. at this plant, a new focus roles off the assembly line every minute and within two years ford will be doubling capacity in the area. >> this year, the total volume of the ford, were 600,000. so it's a big, big key. >> growing sales in china have been one of the top goals since he took over ford in 2006. at the time, f
sector said they had to layoff employees after last month's automatic budget cuts. most said the economy could continue to improver but they said it was a major threat to recovery. but they said it was major threat to recovery. this is due to the higher cost of fuel imports as the yen continued to weakened. finance ministry officials said the trade deficit came to $3.7 billion. exports rose 1.1% from a year earlier in yen terms. that's the first rise in two months. imports rose 5.5%. it rose for a fifth straight month. higher demand for crude oil and liquefied gas was aajor stumble. the dow jones industrial average ended up 14,618. down more than .9 of a percent. for more on how stocks are trading, let's go to ramin at the tokyo stock exchange. seems like we're having a bald week with stocks up and down every day. >> it does seem that way. we had housing data on tuesday that rose and now we see the likes of bank of america and some of the major tech suppliers coming out with weak numbers and forecast this which pulled down the key indexes as well. let's look at how that is translating in
economy? >> very often we have a bigger impact with the congregation by talking to them about do you want to save money on your energy bill? and very seldom does the congregati say oh no. they usually say yes, how do we do that? >> the number of houses of worship that belong to ipl combine their purchasing power to buy cheaper electricity from renewable energy, at rates which can amount to huge savings, especially for the larger churches. ipl also encourages utilizing renewable energy like the solar panels on the roof of the shalom synagogue. >> we have saved many thousands of dollars over the course of 11 years running this building, because of passive solar technology. because of sensitive lightings that we put in place. it absolutely keeps operating costs down. if you make an investment in something like a really efficient boiler, it makes a tremendous difference. >> we're asking our congregations to serve as examples to the community. and then the hope is that when the religious leader can tell his or her congregation that they're saving money on energy, that people will say, i'll go
because they wanted to tap into the talents of ex-patriots to further boost the economy. kim appreciates this policy shift and says she no longer dwells on the past. >> i pray for my people, vietnam people all the time. and i'm so happy that they continually changing. the new generation, they learning a lot. and the country need to be changed. >> reporter: because of the bombing and because of that picture, life hasn't been easy for kim. she says she wants to draw on her experiences to help create a better world. >> if everyone can learn to live with love, with hope and forgiveness, if everyone can learn that, we don't need war at all. right? and the challenges for everyone is that little girl can do it. so everyone can do it too. >> reporter: she's told her story for three decades. and she's determined to keep telling it to people around the world. nhk world, tokyo. >>> time now to get a check on the weather. the sun's out but it was quite chilly. >> it's a chilly morning. we have a high pressure system dominating much of the country creating clear skies and less winds. so those conditi
's an economy and you struggle hard to develop that if you can. but when you're in the theate if people are 40 or 50 feet away there's a lot you have to do with your voice. you have to be able to talk in a way he has a laugh line every night where he says "i'm not prejudice, i'd say that to a blank or a blank." the racial line. and that line should work if you start with "i'm not prejudice, harold." they've got to hear that. but there's always in the theater -- the heavy lifting is done by the actors in order to pull the audience where you want to go. >> rose: do you find that true? this is the first time you've been on broway. >> this is theirsttime i've be on broway. i've done theater in london but it is extraordinary how different so far the experience has been. >> rose: how so? >> well, because i think american audiences are so much more vociferous and kind of -- literally it feels like i imagine kind of elizabethan theater would have been like. >> rose: engaged? >> massively engaged. so responsive to minutia and -- and i think when i first thought this play -- and still now i took it -- i
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the investigation of the boston marathon bombings ramped up today, as police and federal agents pored over the crime scene. three people are dead, including an eight-year-old boy, and more than 170 others were injured. a handful of those remain in critical condition at various boston hospitals. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage of the day after. orter: the morning sun filtered across an empty boylston street today, littered with the remnants of yesterday's marathon and the double bombings that brought it all to an end. >> it kind of looks like a war zone. it's all cordo
. >> major funding for the pbs wshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
: you can come here and help us understand the economy for start starters. >> yeah, that would be fun. that would be fun. >> rose: thank you, congratulations. >> well thanks for having me on. >> rose: rick levin. 20 years, 1993 to 2013 as president of yale university came and yale was not in great shape, he leaves it in fantastic shape. thank you for joining us. see you next time.
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)